Where Laziness Doesn’t Belong in the Story of Poverty

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p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; line-height: 12.0px; font: 93.0px ‘Chronicle Text G2’}p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; line-height: 12.0px; font: 9.5px ‘Chronicle Text G2’}p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; text-indent: 12.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 9.5px ‘Chronicle Text G2’}p.p4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; text-indent: 12.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 9.5px ‘Chronicle Text G2’; min-height: 11.0px}p.p5 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 12.0px; font: 13.0px ‘Chronicle Disp Comp’; color: #00000c}p.p6 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; text-align: justify; line-height: 12.0px; font: 43.0px ‘Chronicle Text G2’}p.p7 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; line-height: 11.0px; font: 8.0px ‘Gotham Narrow Light’}span.s1 {vertical-align: 8.0px; letter-spacing: -0.2px}span.s2 {letter-spacing: -0.1px}span.s3 {font: 8.0px Gotham; letter-spacing: 0.1px}span.s4 {letter-spacing: 0.1px}span.s5 {font: 8.0px ‘Gotham Narrow’; letter-spacing: 0.1px}span.Apple-tab-span {white-space:pre}In 1997, Anthony Cooper was working two jobs and barely getting by. “I would work almost 24 hours straight, go take the kids to school, go home, get some sleep, and go and do it all again.” His two jobs—at a pizza restaurant and a warehouse—provided just enough income to rent an efficiency apartment in Madison, Wisconsin. “My kids slept on one end; I slept on the other end with my futon.” As an African American man with no high school diploma, coming out of a two-year prison sentence, better jobs weren’t easy to get.

With the United States …

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Source: Christian Today